magnetic resonance imaging

The auditory anatomy of the Minke Whale (<em>Balaenoptera acutorostrata</em>): Insights into potential sound reception pathways in a baleen whale

[1431] Yamato M, Ketten DR, Arruda JJ, Cramer SR, Moore K. "The auditory anatomy of the Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata): Insights into potential sound reception pathways in a baleen whale.". In: 19th Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals. Vol. Abstracts. Tampa, FL: Society for Marine Mammology; 2011:. Get PDF:  Abstract.pdf (format PDF / 162 KB) Ken Norris first described a potential mandibular sound reception pathway in odontocetes in 1964. To date, sound reception paths in mysticetes remain unknown. To understand hearing mechanisms in baleen whales, a thorough examination of their auditory anatomy is required. This study combines classical dissection with biomed1cal imaging techniques such as X-ray, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRl) to describe the anatomy of the minke whale head with a focus on the ear region. Six individuals have been examined to date.

Anatomy, three-dimensional reconstructions, and volume estimation of the brain of the Atlantic White-sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) from magnetic resonance images

[52] Montie EW, Moore M, Ketten DR, et al. "Anatomy, three-dimensional reconstructions, and volume estimation of the brain of the Atlantic White-sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) from magnetic resonance images.". In: New England Stranding Conference.; 2004.

Thyroid hormones (TH) play an integral role in neuro-development, particularly in the maturation of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, hippocampus, and inner ear. In rodents, it has been shown that persistent organic pollutants (POPs), particularly polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), interfere with TH signaling. These pollutants are widespread in the marine environment and biomagnify in marine mammals to very high levels. Brominated flame-retardants have also recently been shown to interfere with the TH system in experimental animals.

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